Every Day Witch · For Beginners

Black and White Magick

blackandwhitemagick

When many witches talk about magick, they can refer to it as white or black magick. If you ask a group of witches, they may all give you different answers. The definitions of white and black magick are very opinionated, as they are based on what the individual’s morality. There are even some witches that don’t believe you can categorize witchcraft as such. I believe the intent is what makes the magick black or white, not the spell itself. I will go into what the different categorizes mean, and what types of magick fall into the categories.

White magick is typically referred to as any magick that is acceptable by society and the witch herself. In a less opinionated definition, white magick is considered any magick that is beneficial and provides good intentions to those around you. Spells for luck, abundance and prosperity, healing, and protection are usually considered types of white magick. Those who practice white magick are frequently Wiccans, because they’re main law is to do no harm, but witches of other religions, or no religion, can also follow this law.

Black magick is the opposite, and is considered unacceptable in much of society. Black witchcraft is usually thought to be any spell, ritual, or any other type of magick, that is done with the intent of hurting someone else. While this is the main definition, black magick is any type of magick that is done spitefully, as revenge, for selfish purposes, or to control another. Hexes and curses are often considered black magick.

Most think it is easy to tell the difference, but sometimes, it is not. There are many spells and rituals one would consider white magick, but is actually black. There is some magick considered black, but is actually white. This is because it is the intent of the ritual that makes the magick black or white. I will provide some “color coding” mix ups. If you were to perform a love spell on your crush to make them have feelings for you, that is black magick, because you are not only trying to control how they feel, it is also a selfish spell. If you were to perform a binding spell to keep a loved one from self-harming, that is white magick, even though it is viewed as black magick. If you are still confused, any type of spell, including healing and protection, that is done out of spitefulness or revenge, is and should always be considered black magick. And any type of spell, including curses and hexes that is done with good intent is white magick.

Sometimes it is hard to understand the difference in black and white magick because the line between them is hazy. This is why many witches do not color code magick, and practice what they call grey magick. Grey witchcraft is the combination of the two, and so a grey witch would perform both white and black magick. The raise in grey witchcraft is due to many witches realizing that sometimes you need to fight fire with fire and because many do not realize that the hex they put on their friend’s abusive partner wasn’t all the black.

A last little bit to add, is that black magick should not be taken lightly. If you believe in karma, the threefold law, or not, black magick is nothing to play around with. If you care about the people who are affected (or close to the affected) by black magick, they can change their view on you, as many people, witch or mundane, do not agree with black magick. If you do a quick hexing out of spite or temporary anger, you can easily regret it and black magick can be difficult to undo.

Keep in mind, all of my posts are based on my opinions that I have gathered from my research. You may disagree or have something to add. Please do so kindly in the comments.

Blessed be, brothers and sisters.

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